Tuesday, March 07, 2006

Pink

As, sadly, the color in my younger daughter's cheeks yesterday. Just as I arrived at work I got a call, turning me around to pick her up at school. I arrived just in time. It's tough to be sick at any age—indeed, I'm a pretty pathetic sick person—but it's also hard to be the parent of a sick child, not so much in taking care of her, but in feeling bad for her. And pink, on a more positive note, as in:


Parry's penstemon, which from this angle looks kind of like a rabidly pink dragon. Flower width (but not depth) is about 1/3 to 1/2 inch.
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That bright and crazy Lantana camara, which even when not watered rapidly grows to be a loosely-filled shrub between my yard and my neighbor's yard to the west. His star jasmine vines are not happy about it, I suspect.
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A closer perspective of the lantana flowers, bunched and all tropical.
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Pipsissewas buds, with their cedar-like stems and leaves.
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While this looks like a coral reef inhabitant or even a deep-ocean creature, it's the flowering stem of an aloe-ish plant. Not sure if it's a true aloe, though they're blooming all over Tucson (planted in medians and such) right now.
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A different Parry's pernstemon. The flowers are about an inch deep, and are—not surprisingly—favorites of hummingbirds.
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Brightly flowering autumn sage, a Salvia, is another favorite of hummingbirds, as well as sphinx moths, which hover like hummingbirds. When we first moved in, it was fall, and they were flowering brilliantly at the local garden center, so we planted a whole prairie full, it seemed, in our front and side yards.
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Today (assuming you're reading this on Wednesday) as I mentioned yesterday, I'm off to the annual AWP conference and bookfair at the Hilton and Convention Center in Austin. There, I'll have a Riverfall book signing on Thursday from 11 a.m. to noon, Table 830, which is the Salmon Poetry table. If you're there and you've got a free moment, stop by and say hello. If you're there and you don't have a free moment, stop by and say hello, anyway.

The conference ends Saturday evening, and Sunday I'm going to explore some cool urban locations around town, both old and new, such as The Triangle and 2nd Street District, plus Fredericksburg west of Austin, where I'm staying tonight. Thanks much to Janet Siebert, Civic Arts Coordinator for the City of Austin, and Milosav Cekic, Principal, MC/A Architects and Gateway Planning Group, for the good leads.

Finally, if you haven't yet checked out the newest issue of Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments, why haven't you? It's awesome!

2 comments:

Samantha said...

the "white agave" is not an agave. It is Dudleya lanceolata...and it is quite abundant in Baja up to Mission Valley in San Diego. The leaves are edible and are delicious.

Simmons B. Buntin said...

Thanks for commenting, Samantha, though I'm not sure what you're referring to. Where do I mention "white agave?" Not that I doubt you -- I just don't know the reference!