Sunday, April 02, 2006

Baja Wildflowers

While it wasn't wildflower season in Baja, we saw a number of beautiful blooms nonetheless:

White yucca bloom outside Yuma, Arizona.
Okay, this one technically is from the U.S., taken just outside Yuma, Arizona: a delicious yucca flower.
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Red ocotillo blooms.
Ocotillo were blooming all along the Baja peninsula.
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Yellow blooms of coastal agave.
This is the only shot I got of this amazing, flowering coastal agave, which we saw intermittently below Tecate and above Bahia de Los Angeles. This one is about nine feet tall. Once it blooms, the agave itself dies.
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Yellow bloomstalk on large aloe.
A close-up of the yellow-flowering aloe shown in the previous blog entry. Not sure if this is a native; perhaps to the more southern portions of the peninsula....
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White iceplant bloom with purple center and dew.
Iceplant bloom with morning fog (and center a bit out of focus, I admit). This is definitely not native, but was growing all around our first night's beach campsite.
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White and pink buckwheet flower cluster.
Wild buckwheat growing beside a dirt road, where we also discovered a number of interesting small agaves.
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Cholla cactus nodule.
And technically, this isn't a flower at all: it's a hedgehog cactus nodule captured with my macro lens. But it is reminescent of a bloom, no?
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Blue lupine blooms.
The lupines were still blooming in a wide wash, or arroyo, outside Catavina.
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Last of the lupine bloom stalk, with blue flowers.
This lupine stem, however, is at its last set of flowers.
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Baja yellow deer vetch.
I believe this is deer vetch, also growing in that same wash. Must be tought to turn down these beauties if you're a pollinating insect.
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Red Baja fairyduster flower.
Baja fairyduster in its native habitat: the same wash as the flowers above. Just after photographing, a hummingbird paid this flower a visit, as well.
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Silverblue blooms on plant in front of Mexican blue palms and sunrise.
Some sort of Salvia, or sage, blooming pale blue in the morning light, also in the wash, with Mexican blue palms silhouetted in the distance.
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Single white daisy with yellow center.
A noble, if not lonely and altogether simple, daisy.
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Orange desert globemallow blooms with cactus forest in background.
On the road to Bahia de Los Angeles we spotted desert globemallow, which is also common in our haunts of Southern Arizona. These bushes, however, grew narrow and tall, whereas ours in Arizona are wide and tall.
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Blue/purple and yellow-centered silverleaf nightshade blooms.
Silverleaf nightshade was growing reguarly along the rough edges of Mexico Highway 3. Turns out this bad boy is an aggressive, poisonous weed that has narcotic properties once known and used by indigenous peoples.
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Red Mexican fire barrel cactus blooms.
Mexican fire barrel cactus with red blooms among the boulderfields outside Catavina.
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White cordon bloom atop tall greenblue cordon cactus.
The cordon flowers look almost identical to sagauaro flowers once they're open, though cordons have a much wider flowering season (from March through June, while saguaros bloom only in May).
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Red blooms of Mexican ocotillo tree.
The bloom of the Mexican ocotillo tree---a relatively large (up to fifteen feet tall or so) tree form of the ocotillo---are smaller though otherwise quite similar to the clustered blooms of 'traditional' ocotillos.
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Last red flower on succulent.
These stemmy succulents, which we found in the cordon/boojum forests of central Baja, had all bloomed with this single exception, found directly beneath the world's tallest boojum.
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San Diego sunflowers like these are fairly common along Baja's Pacific coast.
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Yellow, watery bloom on Mexican fire barrel cactus.
This Mexican fire barrel cactus has yellow blooms among vibrant red spines.
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There were a few others I wasn't able to capture on film, and many more that had either just bloomed, or had buds but had not yet bloomed. Considering we didn't expect to find many wildflowers to begin with, we weren't complaining at all.

Up next? Perhaps some cactus and succulent photos, if I haven't already indundated you with too many Baja photos....

3 comments:

Suzanne said...

More! I say more!

gina said...

gorgeous photos, Simmons. I am longing for home.

Jenn said...

Gorgeous work!